This, is a prego no pão. You can get one just about everywhere – they are ubiqutous Portuguese bar food. ? ? In Portuguese, prego means nail, and pão means bread. ? ? Much to the dismay of myself and other Portuguese language learners, no does not mean no. It means on/in (não means no) so.. this translates roughy to 'nail on bread'? ? The nail part? that's referring to nailing the garlic into the meat with a mallet. Either that, or it's named after Manuel Dias Prego. Both stories are correct, depending on who you ask. ? ? In any case, it's a steak sandwich in a ciabatta-like roll, with a side of mustard and occaisionally a fried egg.

This, is a prego no pão. You can get one just about everywhere - they are ubiqutous Portuguese bar food. ?
?
In Portuguese, prego means nail, and pão means bread. ?
?
Much to the dismay of myself and other Portuguese language learners, no does not mean no. It means on/in (não means no) so.. this translates roughy to 'nail on bread'?
?
The nail part? that's referring to nailing the garlic into the meat with a mallet. Either that, or it's named after Manuel Dias Prego. Both stories are correct, depending on who you ask. ?
?
In any case, it's a steak sandwich in a ciabatta-like roll, with a side of mustard and occaisionally a fried egg.

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